5 Ways to Connect With Your Classmates in a Virtual Setting

5 Ways to Connect With Your Classmates in a Virtual Setting

During our Let’s Go to College LA launch, we found out that one of the biggest concerns college students had during this online transition was “how do we meet other people?” While prior to this semester, all it took was a “Do you have a pencil I can borrow?” to spark up a conversation with your classmate, that interaction is not very convenient now in an online setting. Meeting other people is important in order to establish connections, build study groups, and create long-term friendships. We have gathered some ways you can connect with others as we continue online learning! 

 

  1. Facebook Groups: 
    • Yes Facebook is still useful! Did you know some college campuses have Facebook pages and Facebook groups where students sell textbooks, recommend professors and classes, and share different events going on at campus?
  2. Wildfire: 
    • Wildfire is similar to Facebook but on a separate app. In your bio, you can share your major, your graduation year,and your residence hall. This is for folks looking for a more close-knit social network of their campus! 
  3. Zoom: 
    • Fellow introverts, use Zoom private message to your advantage! Respectfully reach out to your classmates asking if they want to form a study group for that class. You can share notes, discuss class topics, and fill each other in if an absence occurs! You can also ask in the chat box if anyone wants to start a Group Me or if one already exists! 
  4. Clubs: 
    • Clubs are still meeting during COVID, preferably check their Instagram pages to follow up on their meeting dates and times. You can also look up the different clubs your school offers and their contact info on your college’s club directory page!
  5. Campus Events: 
    • Campus events are still happening online as well! Apart from clubs hosting activities, campus resources like your Women’s Center, LGBTQ+ center, Black Resource Center, etc hold events too! Explore the different resources you have on campus and connect with them to attend their events and meet others.
Basic Needs: Student Navigator Network

Basic Needs: Student Navigator Network

Basic Needs: Student Navigator Network 

The Student Navigator Network is a referral service amidst COVID-19 that links students with financial, academic, and personal resources. This partnership between Swipe up Hunger and Rise employs and trains student navigators to help their peers and diminish the stigma of asking for help and assistance. Student Navigators help their peers apply for emergency financial assistance, find and access local and communal support, navigate public benefits, and receive timely information on policies, programs, and services. 

COVID-19: Learn the Facts, How to Protect Yourself, and Where to Get Tested

COVID-19: Learn the Facts, How to Protect Yourself, and Where to Get Tested

What is COVID-19? 

Coronavirus is a type of virus. There are different kinds such as the coronavirus that commonly circulates among humans and causes mild illness, like the common cold. The newly identified coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has caused a worldwide pandemic of a respiratory illness called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This new coronavirus emerged in China in December 2019.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms include cough, fever or chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, muscle or body aches, sore throat, a new loss of taste and smell, diarrhea, headache, new fatigue, nausea or vomiting and congestion or runny nose. COVID-19 affects different people in different ways. Infected people have had a wide range of symptoms, from mild symptoms to severe illness. In rare cases, COVID-19 can lead to respiratory problems, kidney failure or death. 

How can I protect myself from COVID-19?

Currently, there is no coronavirus vaccine yet. Since the new coronavirus can be spread from person to person, it is important to use a face mask covering your nose and mouth and practice physical distancing. Prevention involves frequent hand-washing, coughing into the bend of your elbow, and staying home when you are sick. Read more about ways to protect yourself

How is COVID-19 diagnosed and treated?

Diagnosis may be difficult with a physical exam because mild cases of COVID-19 may resemble the flu or a bad cold. A laboratory test can only confirm the diagnosis. As of now, there is no specific treatment for the virus. People who become sick from COVID-19 are treated with supportive measures: those that relieve symptoms. For severe cases, additional options for treatment can be research drugs and therapeutics. 

COVID-19 & students

University campuses across the United States are seeing a rise in positive COVID-19 due to campuses reversing back to in-person classes and students going back to dormitories. Notre Dame officials said that a majority of their cases can be traced to a SINGLE off-campus gathering. Students not wearing masks and gathering in large crowds has added to the rising positive cases universities have seen.

Read article here

Free testing sites in the 9 regions in California 

Superior California 

Testing sites in Stanislaus County 

North Coast

San Francisco Bay Area

Additional testing sites in the San Francisco Bay Area 

Northern San Joaquin Valley 

Central Coast

This includes testing sites in Monterey County, Santa Cruz County, San Benito County 

Testing Sites for San Luis Obispo 

Southern San Joaquin Valley

Inland Empire: This includes various testing sites in Riverside County and San Bernardino County 

Los Angeles County

Orange County 

Testing site for those with symptoms 

San Diego – Imperial 

Others

Testing sites throughout the state of California 

Testing sites throughout California and participating states 

Testing sites in the United States 

Mythbusters 

FACT: The coronavirus disease is caused by a virus,  NOT a bacteria 

  • The virus that causes COVID-19 is in a family of viruses called Coronaviridae. Antibiotics do not work against viruses. In some cases, people who become ill with COVID-19 may develop a bacterial infection as a complication. In this case, antibiotics may be recommended by a healthcare provider. 

FACT: The prolonged use of medical masks when properly worn, DOES NOT cause CO2 intoxication nor oxygen deficiency

  • The prolonged use of medical masks can be uncomfortable, however, it does not lead to CO2 intoxication nor oxygen deficiency. While wearing a medical mask, make sure it fits properly and that it is tight enough to allow you to breathe normally. Do not reuse a disposable mask and always change it as soon as it gets damp. 

FACT: There are currently no drugs licensed for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19

  • While several drug trials are ongoing, there is currently no proof that hydroxychloroquine or any other drug can cure or prevent COVID-19.

FACT: 5G mobile networks DO NOT spread COVID-19

  • Viruses cannot travel on radio waves/mobile networks. COVID-19 is spreading in many countries that do not have 5G mobile networks. 

FACT: The COVID-19 virus can spread in hot and humid climates

  • The COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in any climate, including areas with hot and humid weather. Additionally, there is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill new coronavirus or other diseases. 

Sources: 

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters

Taking Care of Your Body During a Pandemic: Daily Walks, Workouts, and Dancing!

Taking Care of Your Body During a Pandemic: Daily Walks, Workouts, and Dancing!

A lot of our daily routines have halted like driving to work or school, meeting up with friends, and working out. While some of these are still not yet safe to do, there are ways to shift these activities into our new reality. Gyms will most likely be one of the last public spaces in California to open but we have gathered some tips for you to stay fit at home! 

Tips: 

  • Youtube workouts: There’s plenty of workout videos on Youtube that you can follow along to. Try searching for what fits your environment! For example workouts in small spaces, backyard workouts, low impact workouts, no equipment workout, etc.
  • Outdoor Workouts: While gyms are not open, outdoor activities are still open for you to safely participate in. This includes going for a walk, running, hiking at your local trails.  Just make sure to follow the CDC guidelines of staying 6 feet away from others and wearing a mask. Find your local open state park here: State Parks COVID-19 Resource Center
  •  Working out with others: Feeling lonely? Don´t feel too down, you can still work out with others without having to leave your home. Set up a time for you and your friends to work out together via facetime, zoom, etc. Follow an online video or influencer, or switch it up and have someone in your group lead!
  • Daily routine: Little activities like dancing, cleaning, taking your pet for a walk all count as a fitness activity, add fitness into your daily routine and you’ll forget you’re even working out.

Staying fit is not only good for your body but your mental health as well. It allows you to destress and get away from the overwhelming amount of news that is currently happening. But at the same time, we also understand that what’s going on in the world might make it difficult to do things like getting up and being active. Remember to be patient with yourself, you are doing the best you can. Taking a break and just staying in bed, is taking care of yourself and your body just as much. 

 

Find Services to Support Your Mental Health

Find Services to Support Your Mental Health

An important factor in mental health is knowing what help you need and where you can find it. During this time of uncertainty, you might find yourself anxious, overwhelmed, and/or discouraged. They are all valid feelings. If these feelings continue for a long period of time, you might find some security in taking an online mental health assessment. By taking a mental health screening/ assessment, you are opening yourself to resources and support that will help you throughout your college career and after. 

 Mental health screenings are short quizzes that tally up your score and give you a quick analysis of what you might be feeling and if they are symptoms of a mental health condition. Below are some sites that do free online screenings: 

  • Mental Health America: features online mental screening tests in English and Spanish regarding anxiety, depression, postpartum depression, psychosis, eating disorders, and PTSD.
  • American Mental Wellness: a hub of different screening tests where you can take multiple screenings from different medical sites regarding depression, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, abuse/dating violence/ domestic violence, and more.

Once you complete the screenings, both sites provide information regarding where to find resources corresponding to your results. Whether you find out you have symptoms of a condition or not, therapy is something students, especially first-generation students can partake in and take advantage of. 

    • Your College’s Wellness Center: Your college possibly offers mental health services at your Student Health/Wellness Center. Some colleges offer up to three sessions. Take advantage of them, their services are included in the tuition and fees you already pay for!  

There are several resources out there to support your needs and you are worthy of all of them! Any step you take towards the betterment of your mental health is a big win for yourself, your mind and body, and those who care for you. We are ready to support you.