Scholarships Open to Undocumented Students

Scholarships Open to Undocumented Students

Scholarships are a great way to help pay student tuition. Scholarships are hard to come across, especially when trying to find scholarships tailored for you. Whether you are in high school or college, you should be applying to scholarships because tuition changes and so do our own personal lives. Below are 5 scholarships due this month! Be sure to check the eligibility requirements before you start your application. Best of luck, y’all got this! 

5 scholarships due in November 

1. Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship 

Due: November 13, 2020

Award: $40,000 

Academic Level: College Junior or Senior 

Region: National 

Field of Study: Any 

Eligibility:

  • Planning to enroll full-time in a baccalaureate program at an accredited college or university in fall 2021 
  • Demonstrate financial need 
  • Students who have attended a 4-year institution in the past are not eligible for this scholarship 
  • GPA requirement: 3.5

Link: Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship

2. MPower Global Citizen Scholarship

Due: November 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000 – $3,000 

Academic Level: Undergraduate Student, Graduate Student 

Region: National 

Field of Study: Any 

Eligibility:

  •  Enrolled or accepted full-time in a degree-granting program at a U.S. or Canadian school that MPOWER supports 
  • Must be DACA-eligible or authorized to work in the U.S. 

 Link: MPower Global Citizen Scholarship

3. NSHSS Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Award 

Due: November 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000 

Academic Level: High School Junior or Senior 

Region: National Field of 

Study: Any 

Eligibility:

  • Demonstrate commitment to expanding the diversity and inclusion initiatives in their school, community or workplace 

Link: NSHSS Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Award 

4. Emery Reddy Scholarship for Legal Studies 

Due: November 28, 2020 

Award: $2,500 

Academic Level: Undergraduate Student, Graduate Student 

Region: National 

Field of Study: Legal Studies and Law

Eligibility: 

  • Interest in pursuing careers in the legal field  

Link: Emery Reddy Scholarship for Legal Studies  

5. Dr. Juan Andrade, Jr. Scholarship for Young Hispanic Leaders 

Due: November 30, 2020 

Award: $500 – $1,000 

Academic Level: High School Senior, College Freshman or Junior 

Region: National 

Field of Study: Any 

Eligibility: 

  • Enrolled or accepted full-time in an accredited 4-year or 2-year institution in the U.S.  
  • At least one parent must be of Hispanic ancestry 
  • Demonstrate financial need 

Link: Dr. Juan Andrade, Jr. Scholarship for Young Hispanic Leaders  

 Click here for scholarships due in November scroll down to page 70 of the PDF   


IMMIGRANTS RISING SCHOLARSHIP & FELLOWSHIP LISTS

Undergraduate Scholarship List: https://immigrantsrising.org/resource/undergraduate-scholarships/ 

Undergraduate Fellowship List: https://immigrantsrising.org/resource/undergraduate-fellowships/ 

Graduate Scholarship List: https://immigrantsrising.org/resource/graduate-scholarships/ 

Fellowship List: https://immigrantsrising.org/resource/graduate-fellowships/ 

ADDITIONAL DATABASES

Check out these additional databases of scholarships and fellowships available for undocumented young people: 

Dreamers Roadmap: www.dreamersroadmap.com/scholarships/ 

Geneseo Migrant Center: http://migrant.net/scholarships/ 

MALDEF: https://www.maldef.org/resources/scholarship-resources/ 

My Undocumented Life: https://mydocumentedlife.org/ 

Scholarships A-Z: http://www.scholarshipsaz.org/ 

Silicon Valley Community Foundation: https://www.siliconvalleycf.org/scholarships 

The College Expo:https://www.thecollegeexpo.org/resources/scholarships 

CAUTION: Scholarship requirements and deadlines often change from year to year. Please double-check all information listed below with the scholarship directly. If you find any errors, please email us at communications@ immigrantsrising.org so we can update the list

Credit: Immigrants Rising 

 

How to Apply for the California Dream Act

How to Apply for the California Dream Act

College application season is here! That means that applying for financial aid is also here! When you are applying for financial aid, you will either apply for FAFSA or the California Dream Act! So you may be wondering, what is the difference between FAFSA and the CA Dream Act? They both help pay for your college education, but they are two separate applications. Keep reading to find out all the ins and outs of CA Dream Act! 

Background and Eligibility 

Q1. What is the California Dream Act? 

The California Dream Act allows undocumented and nonresident students (U.S. Citizens and eligible non-citizens) who qualify for a non-resident exemption under Assembly Bill 540 (AB 540) to receive certain types of financial aid such as: private scholarships funded through public universities, state administered financial aid, university grants, community college fee waivers, and Cal Grants. In addition, the California Dream Act, allows eligible students to pay in-state tuition at any public college in California.

Q2. Who can apply for the California Dream Act?

Students who live in California and meet the eligibility requirements for a non-resident exemption, as well as students who have a U Visa or TPS status, can use the California Dream Act application (CADAA). Similarly, students without Social Security Numbers or students who have lost DACA status (or never applied for DACA), may still be eligible. The full language of the law and eligibility requirements is stated in CA Education Code 68130.5

Q3. What is the difference between the FAFSA and the California Dream Act application?

Students should only complete one of the applications (not both), according to the citizenship requirements below:

  1. You are eligible to complete the FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov if you are a:
  • U.S Citizen 
  • Permanent Resident 
  • Eligible non-citizen 
  • T Visa holder
  1. You are eligible to complete the CADAA at https://dream.csac.ca.gov/ if you are:
  • Undocumented 
  • Have a valid or expired DACA 
  • U Visa holders 
  • Have Temporary Protected Status (TPS) 2 | Page Revised 09/19 
  • Meet the non-resident exemption requirements under AB 540

Note: If you have further questions, including how to ensure you are completing the correct financial aid application, you can visit the Immigrants Rising website and review the document titled, “FAFSA VS CA Dream Act: Apply to the Correct Financial Aid,” at https://immigrantsrising.org/resource/fafsa-vs-ca-dream-act-apply-to-the-correct-financial-aid-in-ca/ 

Q4. What are the non-resident exemption requirements under AB 540?

Students must meet all four (4) requirements to be eligible:

  1. Time and coursework requirements
  • High school attendance in California for three or more years, OR 
  • Attainment of credits earned in California from a California high school equivalent to three or more years of full-time high school coursework and a total of three or more years of attendance in California elementary schools, California secondary schools, or a combination of those schools. OR 
  • Attainment of credits earned at a California adult school, OR 
  • Credits earned at a California Community College, OR 
  • A combination of the schools listed above 
  1. Degree or unit requirements (completion of either of the following):
  • Graduation from a California high school or the equivalent (GED, HiSET, TASC) •
  • Attainment of an Associate degree from a California Community College 
  • Fulfillment of the minimum transfer requirements from a California Community College to a UC or CSU campus
  1. Register or enroll in an accredited and qualifying California college or university

For a list of Cal Grant eligible schools, please visit: https://webutil.csac.ca.gov/CalGrant_Inst/CalGrantInstSearch.aspx 

  1. Submit a signed “Non-Resident Exemption” Request

Some schools will refer to this document as an “AB 540 affidavit.” This form states that you meet all the requirements to qualify for a non-resident exemption under AB 540 and, if you are undocumented, that you are in the process of legalizing your immigration status (or will do so as soon as you are eligible). 

Please contact the Residency Deputy or the Admissions and Records office at your college for information on how to complete your non-resident exemption form and to determine if supporting documentation is needed. You should complete this form upon accepting an offer to attend a college in California and at least one semester or quarter before you are scheduled to start classes. 

Q5. What should I do if I’ve already submitted a FAFSA before learning that I should have submitted a CADAA?

You must first complete the CADAA and then complete the “Application Conversion Form G-55” which can be obtained at: https://www.csac.ca.gov/post/application-conversion-form Please make a copy of this form for your records, send the original form (along with documentation to prove your identification) to the Commission and contact the financial aid office at the college you plan to attend to inform them of this error.

*For a full copy of of the California Dream Act FAQs for Students and Parents please go to this link: CA Dream Act FAQ

For a checklist of applying  for the CA Dream Act go here: CA Dream Act and Cal Grant Checklist 

For a checklist of applying for a Cal Grant through the CA Dream Act go here: CA Dream Act and Cal Grant Checklist

Sources: CSAC and Immigrants Rising

Campus Resources for Undocumented Students

Campus Resources for Undocumented Students

While California has established statewide programs so undocumented students can safely apply for financial aid, such as California Dream Act, there is a lack of coordination and consistency in how these and other resources are made available to students. The resources vary widely across campuses, and can even be different within the same segment of higher education. This can often confuse or misinform students about critical information. Colleges and universities need to ensure they provide consistent and adequate information and support services for undocumented students that are readily available on their campuses.

The interactive map below serves as a guide to find information about campus centers for undocumented students, support programs, website address with relevant information, and contact information of undocumented allies/liaisons. This information is critical to improve access and success for undocumented students in higher education. 

California Undocumented Student Resources Map

Source: Campaign for College Opportunity and CA Undocumented HIgher-Ed Coalition

 

5 Ways to Connect With Your Classmates in a Virtual Setting

5 Ways to Connect With Your Classmates in a Virtual Setting

During our Let’s Go to College LA launch, we found out that one of the biggest concerns college students had during this online transition was “how do we meet other people?” While prior to this semester, all it took was a “Do you have a pencil I can borrow?” to spark up a conversation with your classmate, that interaction is not very convenient now in an online setting. Meeting other people is important in order to establish connections, build study groups, and create long-term friendships. We have gathered some ways you can connect with others as we continue online learning! 

 

  1. Facebook Groups: 
    • Yes Facebook is still useful! Did you know some college campuses have Facebook pages and Facebook groups where students sell textbooks, recommend professors and classes, and share different events going on at campus?
  2. Wildfire: 
    • Wildfire is similar to Facebook but on a separate app. In your bio, you can share your major, your graduation year,and your residence hall. This is for folks looking for a more close-knit social network of their campus! 
  3. Zoom: 
    • Fellow introverts, use Zoom private message to your advantage! Respectfully reach out to your classmates asking if they want to form a study group for that class. You can share notes, discuss class topics, and fill each other in if an absence occurs! You can also ask in the chat box if anyone wants to start a Group Me or if one already exists! 
  4. Clubs: 
    • Clubs are still meeting during COVID, preferably check their Instagram pages to follow up on their meeting dates and times. You can also look up the different clubs your school offers and their contact info on your college’s club directory page!
  5. Campus Events: 
    • Campus events are still happening online as well! Apart from clubs hosting activities, campus resources like your Women’s Center, LGBTQ+ center, Black Resource Center, etc hold events too! Explore the different resources you have on campus and connect with them to attend their events and meet others.
Applying to Cal State Universities: Everything You Need to Know

Applying to Cal State Universities: Everything You Need to Know

Application season is here again! Below are several Cal State Apply updates as well as some helpful reminders to assist students.

CSU Week is October 5th – 9thThe CSU Chancellor’s Office and all 23 campuses are excited to provide an alternative to in-person college fairs for students and families. Each campus will present a short live session to provide a campus overview, information about the admission process and a question and answer portion. If students are not able to attend, all sessions will be recorded. You can download a postcard and students can register on the CSU Week site.

The priority application period for the Fall 2021 semester opens on Thursday, October 1, 2020, and closes on Friday, December 4, 2020. We encourage you to apply early.

Validation is Here! Students are highly encouraged to find their high school, so they do not need to manually enter their high school coursework, complete a-g matching and ensure validation is properly applied. Students can now search for their high school using the CEEB code.

Cal State Apply Submission Review! The application has been updated with a Submission Review page. The page provides key academic and application information that students may need to review. Please review this information carefully and correct any issues prior to submission.

SAT and ACT Test Scores

  • The CSU has temporarily suspended the use of SAT and ACT test scores for admission purposes. To find more information on the admission requirements for Fall 2021 please visit the First-time Freshman Guidance.
  • If SAT and ACT test scores are submitted, the CSU will use scores for placement in English and mathematics courses. Please visit the CSU Student Success site for additional information on placement. If a student has not taken a test, they can opt out of the Standardized Tests section of Cal State Apply.

Cal State Apply Helpful Links

All Cal State Apply resources have been updated and posted to the Counselor Resource site under First-time Freshman Section. Here are some helpful ones, visit this site for more. There are a lot of resources available for counselors, but some are quite helpful for students. 

CSU Video and Campus Virtual Tour Links

For a new CSU overview video and virtual tours of all 23 campuses go here.  

Reminders & Clarifications

College-Dual Enrollment Coursework – If you have taken college classes while in high school on your own or through a formal dual enrollment program, you should specify on the application that you are graduating high school senior with college credit. Any college courses taken that will appear on a college transcript should be reported on the College Coursework page. For more information please see the College-Dual Enrollment Coursework Guidance.

Help students not miss the deadline to apply for the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). Some but not all campuses have a deadline of December 4, 2020 for EOP applicants. Even if you have submitted their application to the CSU, you can still go back into Cal State Apply to indicate you are interested in applying for EOP if you haven’t missed the campus’s deadline. To check the deadline for the campus(es), go to EOP Admission by Term (also available as a PDF). Also, at least one of the recommendations must be from someone who knows your academic history, such as a teacher or counselor. The other recommendation can be from an individual who can comment about your potential to succeed in college but cannot be the student or a family member.

DACA, undocumented or AB540 students should enter “None” as their citizenship status. Under “Residency,” they should select “California” as their state of residency if they consider California their home.

There have been changes in impaction on both campuses and degree programs for the 2021-22 academic year. Impaction means that there are more qualified applicants for a program or campus than can be accommodated. For the most current information, visit the Impaction center on Calstate.edu.

This resource was compiled with information from the CSU Office of the Chancellor