All About CA DREAM Loans

All About CA DREAM Loans

Background

The creation of the California Dream Loan was first introduced by then-Senator Lara back in 2014. Then in 2018, Assemblymember Ian Calderon introduced AB1895 and it was signed by the California governor. AB1895 provided repayment programs based on someone’s income for the loan. The latest piece of legislation signed by Governor Newson was SB354 by Senator Maria Elena Durazo which expanded the Dream Loan program to graduate students. 

How to apply and know you if are eligible

Students are eligible if they are enrolled at a CSU or a UC where the loan is currently being provided and they are enrolled as an AB540 student. Students may also be eligible if they file the California act application with the financial aid office and show that they are in financial need. Students need to keep in mind that the loan is provided on a main campus basis so they have to make sure to talk to their campus because it is not administered by anyone else.

Important details about California Dream Loans 

  • The interest rate that you agree upon in your contract can not change, it is a fixed interest rate and the interest rates are the same as federal student loans.
  • Just like federal student loans, you have a six-month grace period before you have to pay it back.
  • There is an income-based payment program that schools have come up with. This is based on what you are making as someone who has entered their career and are you eligible to repay this program.

 To learn more about CA Dream Loans click the video below! 

http://

Public Service Loan Forgiveness: Snapshot of the Application Process

To qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF), you must make 120 total monthly payments while:

  1. Enrolled in an Income-Driven Repayment Plan 
  2. Have Federal Direct Loans or have consolidated other federal student loans
  3. Working full-time for a government agency or certain types of nonprofit organizations

Before Graduating or Immediately Upon Graduation – check these eligibility requirements first and early on to plan for Public Service Loan Forgiveness:

  1. Check what kind of loan you have by logging in to www.StudentAid.gov.
  2. Confirm that you have a Federal Direct Loan that is not in default. This is the only federal loan that is eligible for PSLF. 
  3. If some of your federal student loans are not Direct Loans (FFEL and Perkins Loan), they need to be consolidated to qualify; this is likely your situation if you borrowed before 2011. Payments on FFEL or Perkins Loans made before you consolidate will not be counted. Depending on your circumstance there may be pros and cons to consolidating in order to apply for PSLF.

As You Start Working in Public Service – Document Your Employment Using the PSLF Application Form:

  1. Submit a PSLF application form every year or when you change employers. You’ll want to have documented every qualified employer where you worked while you made a payment towards PSLF. Especially if you have multiple public service employers.
  2. Make sure that your PSLF application form has all required fields completed. Incomplete forms or inconsistencies may affect your eligibility. If you do not meet a PSLF qualification, the response letter to your application will provide more information.
  3. Make sure you have all the information required: employer’s address, Employer Identification Number (EIN) which can be found on your Wage and Tax Statement (W-2), and consistent info with your previous application.

As You’re Working in Public Service – Submitting your forms using the PSLF Help Tool:

  1. Log in with your FSA ID. The tool will import your loan info automatically.
  2. The Tool will ask a series of questions to confirm you’re on the right track to loan forgiveness and that your employer qualifies for PSLF.
  3. Find out if your loans qualify and options available to you if they don’t.
  4. Get a signature from an “authorized official” at your employer, typically someone in your human resources office.
  5. Print and mail your completed form. Save and archive your documentation (PSLF application, response letters from FedLoan Servicing, and employment documents) in case there are any discrepancies.

After Working at Least 10 Years in Public Service – Applying for PSLF and Getting Your Loan Forgiven:

  1. Upon making your 120th payment you’re ready to apply for PSLF. You must still be working for a qualified employer when you submit your application.
  2. Gather your current employer information and any documentation used to prove previous employers qualified while you made payments towards PSLF.
  3. Complete and submit the PSLF application by using the PSLF Help Tool (see above), by mail, or fax. 
  4. If your PSLF application is approved, then all remaining balance including interest and outstanding principal will be forgiven. Any payments made after the required 120 will be refunded as well.

Provided by:

Federal Loans vs. Private Loans

What are the Differences Between Federal & Private Student Loans?

Federal student loans are provided by the government after a student or their family fills out a FAFSA. The conditions are mandated by law and include specific protections (such as fixed interest rates and income-driven repayment plans) not usually associated with private loans. Unlike federal loans, private loans are provided by private companies like banks or credit unions. Private loans have terms and conditions that are set by the lender. Private student loans are generally more expensive and offer fewer benefits and protections than federal student loans.

How Do I Know If I Have a Private or Federal Loan?

Federal student loan information can be found by going to www.StudentAid.gov. If you do not know the name of your lender or servicer, and you cannot find your loan information at StudentAid.gov, you most likely have a private loan. You can find information about your private loan by checking your credit report.

Any student loan information that shows up on your www.StudentAid.gov account are federal loans. It is common that borrowers have both Federal and private loans. If you have a loan that doesn’t show up on your www.StudentAid.gov account, it is important to check your credit report to find out who your private loan company is.

Are There Different Interest Rates With Federal and Private Loans?

Federal loans have fixed interest rates that are usually lower than private loans. Private student loans can have variable or fixed interest rates. The interest rate on private student loans can be higher or lower than the interest rate on federal loans.

Do Private Student Loans Have Repayment Plans?

Only federal student loans have mandated repayment plans by the government. If you have a private student loan, and are struggling to make your monthly payment, you should contact your loan servicer to inquire about any repayment plans they offer. 

Provided by:

COVID-19 Relief: CARES Act & Executive Action Impact on Student Loans

What is the CARES Act & Executive Action?

The CARES Act provides relief to some student loan borrowers during COVID-19 by mandating that federally-held, direct student loans are automatically placed in an administrative forbearance that suspends both payments and interest until September 30, 2020. President Joe Biden used executive action to extend this relief until September 30, 2021.

Who qualifies to have loans paused?

Under the CARES Act and executive actions, federal Direct Loans all qualify as well as Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) that are held by the Department of Education. The only loans that do not qualify are commercially-held FFEL Loans, Perkins Loans owned by your college, and private loans.

Is the pause automatic or do I need to opt-in?

The pause on most federal student loans is automatic and you DO NOT need to opt-in. Eligible federal loans are automatically placed in administrative forbearance from March 13, 2020, to September 30, 2021. If you made a payment after March 13, you can request a refund by contacting your servicer.

How does the pause work with the grace period upon graduation?

Existing rules allow for students who leave their program or recent graduates to not begin making payments on their federal student loans until 6 months after leaving school – this is called the “grace period.” Those whose “grace period” ends during the pause on federal student loan payments will automatically have their payments paused as well. Those whose “grace period” ends after the pause on federal student loan payments expires will immediately enter repayment.

How does this affect Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

The Department of Education states that suspended payments WILL be counted toward Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) if you meet all other loan forgiveness requirements. These requirements include if: (1) you have Federal Direct Loans, (2) continue to work for an eligible employer, and (3) were on a qualifying repayment plan prior to the implementation of the CARES Act.

What happens if I am already in default?

The Department of Education announced a pause on debt collection against defaulted borrowers, including wage garnishment, reduction of tax refunds, and reduction of Social Security and Social Security disability benefits. Recent guidance states that the pause on debt collection applies from March 13, 2020, to September 30, 2021. If collections against you were being processed after March 13, you are eligible for a refund on that amount.

What happens after September 30, 2021?

At this time, federal student loan payments will resume on October 1, 2021. If you are concerned about your ability to make payments, the guidance states that your federal loans are eligible for an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan, setting your payment based on your income for the next 12 months.

Provided by:

Applying for Public Service Loan Forgiveness: 3 Tips for Success

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) is a federal program that could erase your federal student loan debt. This program is designed to support people working in lower-paying, but vitally important public service jobs, like non-profit work, social work, healthcare, and others.

It is important for you to understand that there are requirements you must meet to receive this loan forgiveness – your student loans won’t just be automatically forgiven after a couple of years of public service work. There are several requirements you must meet to receive public service loan forgiveness. You must meet these requirements for a total of 120 monthly payments, so it is important that you are on track early on. Make sure to read all the requirements carefully. After meeting all the requirements, and after you’ve paid 120 monthly payments (that’s at least 10 years of cumulative payments), you will need to submit an application to apply for PSLF to have your debt forgiven. Here are some steps you can take to ensure you receive the loan forgiveness you are expecting.

  1. Have the Right Type of Loan – Federal Direct Loans 
    • Federal Direct Loans are the ONLY type of loan that qualifies for PSLF. If you have a different type of federal loan, for example, Family Federal Education Loans (FFEL) or Perkins, don’t worry! You can consolidate your loan to qualify. Word of caution here – there are many different factors to consider when consolidating a loan as this creates a new loan with new terms. Depending on your circumstance there may be pros and cons to consolidating in order to apply for PSLF.
  2. Have the Right Type of Employer:
    • You must work full-time for a qualifying employer while you are making your 120 monthly payments to be eligible for PSLF. Working full-time means working at least 30 hours per week or meeting your employer’s definition of full-time. This is about who your employer is, not your job title. Many qualifying employers include non-profits, government jobs, and public service work. Check if your employer qualifies by asking your Human Resources Department. 
  3. Be in the Right Type of Repayment Plan – Income-Driven Repayment:
    • To benefit from PSLF, you should repay your federal student loans under an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan. Income-driven repayment plans require you to update (or “recertify”) your income/family size each year. Income-driven repayment plans can be highly beneficial for borrowers that have lower-incomes. Payments can be as low as $0.00 per month, especially for borrowers facing a loss of income or job, and still, qualify towards the required 120 monthly payments for PSLF.

There are other federal repayment options that do NOT count towards PSLF. These include Extended Repayment, Graduated Repayment, and Extended-Graduated Repayment. Also, you can’t make a qualifying payment while your loans are in any of these statuses: in-school status, the grace period, deferment, forbearance, and default.

You can’t qualify for PSLF faster by making larger payments. In fact, making larger payments can create a domino effect that disqualifies future payments as well. So, you will need to make a payment equal to the exact amount owed for that month to receive credit for a qualifying PSLF payment.

For full PSLF requirements and details go to www.studentaid.gov

Provided by: